Is This the End of New Pipelines? New York Times ($)

Defeats at three projects reflect increasingly sophisticated legal challenges, shifting economics and growing demands by states to fight climate change.

By Hiroko Tabuchi and Brad Plumer • Published July 8, 2020 | Updated Jan. 18, 2021

Protesters against the Dakota Access pipeline in early 2017. On Monday, a court ruled the pipeline project must be shut down pending an environmental review.
Protesters against the Dakota Access pipeline in early 2017. On Monday, a court ruled the pipeline project must be shut down pending an environmental review. (Credit: Michael Nigro/Pacific Press, via LightRocket, via Getty Images)

They are among the nation’s most significant infrastructure projects: More than 9,000 miles of oil and gas pipelines in the United States are currently being built or expanded, and another 12,500 miles have been approved or announced — together, almost enough to circle the Earth.

Now, however, pipeline projects like these are being challenged as never before as protests spread, economics shift, environmentalists mount increasingly sophisticated legal attacks and more states seek to reduce their use of fossil fuels to address climate change. MORE>>


𝐒𝐎𝐔𝐑𝐂𝐄 𝐀𝐑𝐓𝐈𝐂𝐋𝐄: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/climate/dakota-access-keystone-atlantic-pipelines.html